meditative space

Here’s a Scandinavian version of meditative space: the kamppi chapel of silence by Helsinki-based K2S Architects.  The solid, windowless building blocks out the sound of an overly cluttered mind or city noise – useful when the roar of vodka-inebriated soccer fans visiting Helsinki from Russia becomes overwhelming.

CNC-cut glue-laminated elements make up the structural framework of the building with spruce wood planks used for the cladding of the chapel.  The client was the City of Helsinki and Helsinki Parish Union.  (Images Tuomas Uusheimo.)

The Cube, designed by the talented, young Canadian studio 5468796 Architecture, sits like a jewel in Winnipeg’s historic Exchange District.

Designed with twisted aluminum, custom-fabricated by a Hutterite colony, the malleable screen surrounds a room of concrete – reminiscent of Tadao Ando – which serves as a popular stage and event space.  As a private meditation space, you could lose yourself in the reflections.

Closer to home is one of the most enchanting, unscripted meditative rooms: Wolf Lake, Ontario.  Where the walls and the sky roof change with the seasons.

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7 comments
  1. Stephen Gary McLaughlin said:

    Thank you .

    Sent from my iPhone

  2. dreamy. I just flopped on to my bed with a cup of lemon tea and your blog post.
    perfection.

  3. Lisa: firstly thanks for these many options to slow one’s mind down. They all have much merit and portray much thought on the creators part. In this case materials seem to be most persuasive; eg., wood and the warmth and comfort it offers. And of course the curvilinear lines offer peace and tranquility.
    Yes Wolf Lake is most inviting and successful. As much as we use nature as a source for design we have yet to match it.
    Best regards,
    Bruce

  4. Pat Thompson said:

    Stirring images, Lisa. Thank you. Have you seen the meditation space at 40 Oaks in Regent Park yet? They made the most beautiful light fixture out of Lake Ontario beach glass. http://vimeo.com/39495823#

    • Hello Lisa: Hats-off to Pat Thompson for sharing the story about a number of people using their fine minds and creativie hands to transform found objects into exquisitely farbricated illumination which will enrich the meditative experience. Best regards, Bruce

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